Archives: Fourth Circuit

Securities Class Actions Continue To Rise

View Adam Doerr's Complete Bio at robinsonbradshaw.com Earlier this year, we reported that Multiple Studies Show Increase in Securities Class Actions. Cornerstone Research, one of the groups covered in our earlier report, recently issued its 2016 Midyear Assessment. This new analysis, which covers cases filed in January through June of this year, is consistent with several of the trends we reported previously, including the increasing number of securities class actions, the rise in the number of cases against smaller companies, and the increase in the number of Fourth Circuit cases.

Of particular interest is the significant increase in the number of merger & acquisition cases filed in federal courts. In the first half of 2016, there were 24 filings involving M&A transactions – a 167% increase from the second half of 2015. Given the size of this increase, it seems likely that this is related to significant changes in Delaware’s handling of merger objection litigation following the Trulia decision, and we will continue to monitor how this shift impacts merger litigation in federal courts in the Carolinas and the North Carolina Business Court.

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Multiple Studies Show Increase in Securities Class Actions

View Adam Doerr's Complete Bio at robinsonbradshaw.comRecent studies by PricewaterhouseCoopers, NERA Economic Consulting, Cornerstone, and Kevin LaCroix of D&O Diary have all found that federal securities class actions are on the rise. According to PwC, the data shows a trend towards more cases filed against smaller companies, especially for claims regarding accounting irregularities. Smaller companies also face a significant risk of claims regarding inadequate internal controls over financial reporting, likely due to their smaller size and more limited resources.

NERA found that standard federal securities class actions – complaints alleging violations of Rule 10b-5, Section 11, or Section 12 – increased for the third straight year. Both PwC and NERA determined that the number and proportion of federal cases challenging mergers and acquisitions also increased in 2015. It is unclear whether this is a result of Delaware’s increased scrutiny of merger litigation settlements, but we will monitor this trend, which also affects merger litigation in state courts, including the North Carolina Business Court.

Cornerstone analyzed the timing and progress of cases and found that the time to resolution appears to be increasing. Fewer cases were dismissed within the first year after they were filed, and the percentage of cases settled within three years also decreased. Despite this, only a small proportion of cases – just 26% — made it to a motion for class certification. The other 74% of cases were dismissed or resolved prior to class certification. When courts actually decided class certification motions, they granted them 75% of the time.

The studies were not consistent in identifying the number of cases filed in the Fourth Circuit, but all agreed that filings here are well behind those filed in the Second and Ninth Circuits, which saw more than 60% of securities class action filings. Although the Fourth Circuit did not see as much volume as these courts, one of the 10 largest settlements of 2015, a $146.3 million settlement of misrepresentation claims against an energy company, took place in the Western District of North Carolina.

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Fourth Circuit Holds that Court, Not Arbitrators, Decides Whether Arbitration Agreement Provides for Class Arbitration

View David Wright's Complete Bio at robinsonbradshaw.comCharacterizing an unpublished 2007 decision to the contrary as a “thin reed” displaced by later Supreme Court guidance, the Fourth Circuit held that the question of whether an arbitration agreement permits class proceedings is a “gateway” issue for the court, and not a procedural question left to the arbitrator to decide. Del Webb Communities, Inc. v. Carlson, No. 15-1385 (4th Cir. March 28, 2016). The case was filed after a builder – facing numerous construction defect claims and an arbitrator’s decision whether to certify those claims as a class proceeding – filed a petition to compel “bilateral arbitration” under the Federal Arbitration Act. The district court found that the decision whether to conduct class arbitration was a threshold question for the arbitrator. A unanimous Fourth Circuit panel disagreed.

After dealing with some jurisdictional issues – including CAFA jurisdiction and the Rooker-Feldman doctrine – the Court found that, although the Supreme Court had not decided the question, the high court’s adumbrations provided strong guidance on the subject. Writing for the panel, Judge Diaz concluded that a decision concerning “class arbitration” was tantamount to a question concerning arbitrability, which placed the issue squarely within the province of the judiciary under prevailing authority. In Stolt-Nielsen S.A. v. AnimalFeeds International Corp., 559 U.S. 662 (2010), the Supreme Court had held that a party cannot be forced to arbitrate on a class-wide basis absent “a contractual basis for concluding that the party agreed to do so.” But the Court didn’t decide in that case who (the Court or the arbitrator) determined whether this “contractual basis” existed. The Fourth Circuit, agreeing with other Circuits on the question, observed that there was a world of difference between assuming the risk of an error in a bilateral arbitration agreement and accepting such a risk in a class arbitration proceeding. The Court viewed this question as tantamount to a decision on the scope of arbitration, which is a question reserved for the court unless the parties have clearly and unmistakably provided to the contrary.

Never mentioned by the Court in its decision is a line of cases holding that when the parties adopt the AAA rules in their contract, they have “clearly and unmistakably” committed the issue of arbitrability to the arbitrator. In Del Webb, the parties had selected the AAA Construction Arbitration Rules, and Rule R-9 of those rules expressly provides that “The arbitrator shall have the power to rule on his or her own jurisdiction, including any objections with respect to the existence, scope or validity of the arbitration agreement.” In a recent North Carolina Business Court decision, Judge Bledsoe – citing numerous federal district and circuit court opinions on the subject – held that the adoption of the AAA rules in the parties’ contract “clearly and unmistakably” committed the issue of the arbitrability of a claim to the arbitrator. But Judge Bledsoe’s case did not involve class arbitration, and it is clear that the Fourth Circuit was not about to give final say to an arbitrator concerning certification of a putative class unless every party to the contract had clearly signed off on that proposition.

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Fourth Circuit Upholds (B)(2) Settlement Covering 200 Million People

View David Wright's Complete Bio at RBH.com Since the Supreme Court’s decision in Wal-Mart, courts have been struggling to breathe life into Rule 23(b)(2) when monetary damages are a possibility. Wal-Mart held that back pay constituted the kind of individualized monetary relief that was hardly “incidental” to claims of injunctive relief, upon which (b)(2) classes are essentially founded. In Berry v. LexisNexis Risk and Information Analytics Group, Inc., No. 14-2006 (4th Cir. Dec. 4, 2015), the Fourth Circuit grappled with this issue, albeit in the context of a nonmonetary (b)(2) settlement that, by its terms, continued to allow class members to pursue certain claims for monetary relief. Continue reading Fourth Circuit Upholds (B)(2) Settlement Covering 200 Million People

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Fourth Circuit Upholds District Court’s Decision Not to Provide Pre-Certification Notice to Putative Class Members

View David Wright's Complete Bio at RBH.comIn an “opt out” class action, sending notice to class members following class certification is not only routine, but required by due process. But does a district court have the right to order notice prior to a decision on class certification? In Gardener v. GMAC, Inc., No. 14-208 (4th Cir. Aug. 6, 2015), both the district court and the Fourth Circuit “assumed for the sake of argument” that Rule 23(d)(1)(B) provides the trial court with that authority. But each declined to accept the plaintiffs’ argument that the facts warranted such notice. Observing that pre-certification dismissal does not amount to res judicata of the absent class members’ claims, Judge Diaz concluded that the district court’s decision not to order notice before it granted summary judgment fell well within the court’s discretionary powers. The panel’s decisions suggests that unnamed class members’ interests must be “compelling” in order to justify pre-trial notice.

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