The Case of the $5 Footlong*

View Adam Doerr's Complete Bio at robinsonbradshaw.comFor what appears to have been a frivolous lawsuit, In re: Subway Footlong Sandwich Marketing and Sales Practices Litigation generated an interesting opinion from the Seventh Circuit full of class-action issues. The case originated when an Australian teenager posted a photo of an 11-inch Subway sandwich, with a tape measure, on his Facebook page. Coming in the midst of Subway’s $5 FootlongsTM campaign, the picture went viral, and class-action cases were soon pending.

After early discovery showed that most “footlongs” were, in fact, 12 inches long, plaintiffs’ counsel ran into a series of problems with their damages class under Rule 23(b)(3), including:

    • commonality (“The overwhelming majority of Subway’s sandwiches lived up to their advertised length, so individual hearings would be needed to identify which purchasers actually received undersized sandwiches. But sandwich measuring by Subway customers had been a fleeting social-media meme; most people consumed their sandwiches without first measuring them”);
    • materiality under state consumer protection laws (“Individualized hearings would be necessary to identify which customers, if any, deemed the minor variation in bread length material to the decision to purchase”); and
    • damages (“[A]ll of Subway’s raw dough sticks weigh exactly the same, so the rare sandwich roll that fails to bake to a full 12 inches actually contains no less bread…. As for other sandwich ingredients, class members could be as profligate or as temperate as they pleased: Subway’s ‘sandwich artists’ add toppings at the customer’s request.”)

The plaintiffs shifted strategy, moving from a damages class to a Rule 23(b)(2) class for injunctive relief. Following mediation, the case settled for a series of “procedures designed to achieve better bread-length uniformity,” including bread oven inspections and use of a “tool” (perhaps a ruler?) to measure compliance. To deal with deficient rolls that slipped past the watchful eyes of the inspectors, a poster would be prominently displayed at each restaurant: “Due to natural variations in the bread baking process, the size and shape of bread may vary.”

The settlement provided for $520,000 in fees for plaintiffs’ attorneys, enough for nearly 20 miles of sandwiches, and incentive payments of $500 each for the class representatives. But one class member—Theodore Frank—objected. He argued that the settlement was worthless to the class of Subway customers, who still faced a non-neglible (and relatively meaningless) risk of a short sandwich despite the large payment to class counsel. The attorneys for the class responded that if Subway continued to sell sandwiches less than 12 inches long, failure to comply with the settlement could be punished by contempt. The Seventh Circuit was not persuaded: “Contempt as a remedy to enforce a worthless settlement is itself worthless. Zero plus zero equals zero.”

That the Seventh Circuit even heard an appeal from a settlement approved by the district court also reveals an interesting dynamic in class-action settlements. Class members generally have the right to object to a proposed class-action settlement, and they can attempt to appeal a settlement approved over their objections. Class member objections often involve the fees to be paid to the plaintiffs’ attorneys, especially when the settlement appears to benefit attorneys more than the members of the class. Mr. Frank, the objector in the Subway case, is an attorney who has objected to dozens of class-action settlements as the director of the Center for Class Action Fairness, a nonprofit that describes itself as challenging unfair class-action procedures.1 Interestingly, although Mr. Frank is generally a nonprofit objector, in 2015 he was involved in a situation he described as “lurid” and “Grishamesque” when his $250,000 consulting agreement with a professional serial objector (an attorney who objects to class-action settlements in hopes of being paid to drop the objection by the lead attorneys) became public, as reported by Alison Frankel at Reuters.

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1 The Center for Class Action Fairness is part of the Competitive Enterprise Institute, a conservative organization that advocates for issues including tort reform. Critics of these tort reform efforts contend that by selectively focusing on unrepresentative cases, like litigation over the length of a Subway sandwich, tort reformers are attempting to paint a distorted picture of the legal system that ignores the important role that class actions play in protecting consumers and enforcing civil rights.

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About Adam Doerr

Adam Doerr helps companies untangle complex litigation problems, with a special focus on class actions. He has handled class actions in state and federal court involving securities law, mergers and acquisitions, employment, and contract issues.