All posts by Amanda Pickens

Recent Filings – March Digest

View Amanda Pickens’ Complete Bio at robinsonbradshaw.comNot every class action court filing in North and South Carolina becomes a full-length post on our blog. Here is a recap of March’s filings:

Angeles-Gomez, et al. v. Rick Wolf Landscape, LLC, et al., No. 2:17-cv-00009 (E.D.N.C. March 31, 2017) (putative collective and class action brought under FLSA and state wage and hour laws by current and/or former employees of the defendant landscaping and lawn care business and its managing members for alleged unpaid overtime compensation).

Isaman, et al. v. Housekeeping Services of Hilton Head, LLC, et al., No. 9:17-cv-00800 (D.S.C. March 26, 2017) (putative class action and purported collective action brought under FLSA and state wage and hour laws alleging Housekeeping Services of Hilton Head, the low country’s largest cleaning service, failed to pay hourly wages due including overtime compensation).

Oldfield Community Association, et al. v. TI Oldfield Development, LLC, et al., No. 9:17-cv-00794 (D.S.C. March 24, 2017) (purported class action removed from South Carolina state court to federal court brought by a non-profit corporation formed for the benefit of homeowners and lot owners of Oldfield, a Beaufort County community, alleging defendant board and director members misappropriated funds, breached fiduciary duties, etc. and requesting a preliminary injunction).

Beasley, et al. v. Bojangles Restaurants, Inc., et al., No. 1:17-cv-00255 (M.D.N.C. March 21, 2017) (purported class action and collective action brought under FLSA by employees alleging defendants misclassified them and failed to pay overtime compensation).

Blue Ridge Podiatry Assocs., P.A. v. Annexmed Billing Servs. Inc., et al., No. 1:17-cv-00078 (W.D.N.C. March 20, 2017) (putative class action brought under the Telephone Consumer Protection Act alleging the defendants sent unsolicited fax advertisements to plaintiff and the proposed class in June 2016 without prior express consent).

Sandviks v. PhD Fitness, LLC, No. 1:17-cv-00744 (D.S.C. March 17, 2017) (products liability class action lawsuit alleging defendant, a manufacturer of sports-oriented dietary supplement products, has marketed their products in a systematically misleading manner and these misrepresentations regarding ingredients and proper dosing have injured plaintiffs).

Bobiak, et al. v. The Morgan Group, Inc., No. 3:17-cv-00142 (W.D.N.C. March 17, 2017) (putative collective and class action brought by employees of The Morgan Group, a high-end multifamily development, construction and property management company, for recovery of unpaid wages and unpaid overtime/bonus compensation under FLSA and state wage and hour laws).

Indian Harbor Insurance Co. v. Kriewaldt, et al., No. 2:17-cv-00732 (D.S.C. March 17, 2017) (putative class and declaratory judgment action brought by Indian Harbor Insurance Co. seeking a determination from the federal court of its defense and coverage obligations based on two underlying South Carolina state court lawsuits, one a class action, which allege construction defects caused by the defendants in a Charleston townhome development).

Fuerte, et al. v. Convergys Corp., et al., No. 4:17-cv-00701 (D.S.C. March 14, 2017) (putative collective and class action brought under FLSA and state wage and hour laws by at-home customer representative employees of Convergys, a customer outsourcing company, who performed required “off the clock” and computer technical malfunction work but allege not to have been compensated for this time).

Mauer v. Argos Therapeutics, Inc., et al., No. 1:17-cv-00216 (M.D.N.C. March 14, 2017) (putative class action brought by shareholders of Argos, an immune-oncology company, alleging the company violated federal securities laws by making false statements in its securities filings).

Hegeman v. Babcock & Wilcox Enters., et al., No. 3:17-cv-00125 (W.D.N.C. March 13, 2017) (putative class action on behalf of shareholders of Babcock & Wilcox, a provider of energy and environmental technologies and services for power and industrial markets, asserting federal securities violations for the company providing alleged false and misleading statements and failing to provide material facts about the company).

Lawrence, et al. v. General Panel Corp., No. 2:17-cv-00600 (D.S.C. March 3, 2017) (putative class action removed from South Carolina state court and brought by homeowners alleging structures known as SIPS, manufactured by Defendant using sheets of oriented strand board, were defective and have caused damage to their homes and buildings).

Ollila, et al. v. Babcock & Wilcox Enters., Inc. et al.; No. 3:17-cv-00109 (W.D.N.C March 3, 2017) (putative class action brought by shareholders of Babcock & Wilcox Enterprises, Inc., a technology-based provider of power generation equipment, alleging violations of securities laws claiming the company’s officers and/or directors made false and misleading statements in press releases, analyst conference calls and SEC filings starting in 2015).

Speights, et al. v. Blue Cross and Blue Shield of South Carolina; No. 9:17-cv-594 (D.S.C. March 3, 2017) (putative class action removed from South Carolina state court brought by consumers alleging Blue Cross and Blue Shield denied requests to pay for healthcare that was approved and/or requested by physicians).

Jeffers, et al.v.Toyota Motor Corporation, et al., No. 4:17-cv-00577 (D.S.C. March 2, 2017) (purported class action brought under consumer protection laws alleging defendants manufactured defective dashboards in various car models and have not adequately handled a warranty program that was promised in previous litigation relating to the same issue).

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Dish Network Hopes for a New Trial of Telemarketing Class Action Lawsuit after $20.5 Million Jury Verdict

View Amanda Pickens’ Complete Bio at robinsonbradshaw.comDish Network has asked the Middle District of North Carolina for a new trial in its telemarketing class action lawsuit after a jury found Dish liable for violations of the Telephone Consumer Protection Act. After a five-day trial ending on January 19th, a jury awarded damages to the class of $20.5 million.

The lawsuit was filed in 2014 by lead plaintiff Thomas Krakauer alleging Satellite Systems Network, an authorized Dish dealer, called him multiple times between 2009 and 2011 despite being listed on the Do Not Call registry. In September 2015, Judge Catherine Eagles certified two classes, both consisting of persons on the Do Not Call registry who received telemarketing calls from Dish or Satellite System Network between 2010 and 2011.

After the United States Supreme Court decided Spokeo Inc. v. Robins, Dish filed a motion to dismiss or, in the alternative, to decertify the class. We highlighted the issues before the Spokeo Court in our previous blog post. In Spokeo, the United States Supreme Court vacated and remanded a decision allowing a consumer who suffered no concrete harm to sue Spokeo Inc. for procedural violations of the Fair Credit Reporting Act. But the Supreme Court left the opportunity open for plaintiffs in other cases to rely on procedural violations entailing a risk of “concrete injury” to establish standing. The Supreme Court found that the Ninth Circuit’s standing analysis was incomplete because it failed to consider both requirements of an injury-in-fact, that the injury be both concrete and particularized. The Ninth Circuit’s opinion concerned only the particularization of the injury-in-fact.

In August 2016, in a six-page opinion, Judge Eagles denied Dish’s motion to dismiss and to decertify the class based on Spokeo. Judge Eagles noted that although Spokeo “clarified the meaning of a concrete injury,” it did not fundamentally change the doctrine of standing. She found that now “a concrete injury ‘must exist,’ but it can be intangible.” Judge Eagles held that the telemarketing calls made in violation of the Telephone Consumer Protection Act were more than bare procedural violations; the calls “form[ed] concrete injuries because unwanted telemarketing calls are a disruptive and annoying invasion of privacy.” Dish sought an interlocutory appeal of this decision, which was also denied.

Now, after a five-day trial and a $20.5 million jury verdict, Dish is hoping for a new trial. Dish claims, among other things, that the verdict violates Dish’s due process rights because Judge Eagles allowed the jury to impose aggregate damages, rather than allowing Dish to defend each individual claim of an improper phone call. The jury calculated damages by assigning $400.00 per call to the 51,119 distinct phones calls, totaling approximately $20.5 million. Plaintiffs’ response to Dish’s motion for a new trial is due March 28th. If Dish’s motion for a new trial is denied, Dish will likely appeal these issues to the Fourth Circuit. Stay tuned for further developments.

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Recent Filings – February Digest

View Amanda Pickens’ Complete Bio at robinsonbradshaw.comNot every class action court filing in North and South Carolina becomes a full-length post on our blog. Here is a recap of February’s filings:

Bradley, et al. v. Samsung Electronics, et al., No. 1:17-cv-00171 (M.D.N.C. February 28, 2017) (purported class action brought under various state consumer protection and trade practice laws alleging defendants manufactured home washing machines with a defect that caused explosion during normal use.)

Matthews, et al. v. TCL Communication Inc.,  No. 3:17-cv-00095 (W.D.N.C. February 27, 2017) (putative class action removed from Mecklenburg County state court to federal court brought under state consumer laws alleging defendants removed a key compatibility feature of a specific brand of Smartphone which rendered the phone defective).

Cash-Davis, et al. v. Access Community, et al.; No. 3:17-cv-00466 (D.S.C. February 16, 2017) (putative class action and collective action originally filed in Lexington County state court, removed to federal court and brought under FLSA and state wage and hour laws alleging defendants changed the terms of employees’ pay arrangements and failed to pay compensation due).

Holland, et al v. Fulenwider Enterprises, Inc., et al., No. 1:17-cv-00048 (W.D.N.C. February 15, 2017) (purported collective and class action brought under FLSA alleging defendants misclassified assistant managers working at local KFC, Taco Bell, and Long John Silver franchises and failed to pay overtime wages).

Helen Holland, et al v. Bojangles’ Restaurants, et al., No. 3:17-cv-00050 (W.D.N.C. February 6, 2017) (purported class action and collective action brought under FLSA by employees alleging defendants misclassified them and failed to pay overtime compensation).

King, et al. v. Smooth Sailing, et al., No. 4:17-cv-00309 (D.S.C. February 2, 2017) (collective and class action alleging defendants failed to pay wages owed to employees in violation of FLSA and state wage and hour laws).

E&G, et al. v. Mount Vernon Mills, et al., No. 6:17-cv-00318 (D.S.C. February 2, 2017) (putative class action alleging violations of the Telephone Consumer Protection Act based on unsolicited facsimile transmission advertisements to plaintiffs).

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Recent Filings – January Digest

View Amanda Pickens’ Complete Bio at robinsonbradshaw.com Not every class action court filing in North and South Carolina becomes a full-length post on our blog. Here is a recap of January’s filings:

Hieber v. The Asset Recovery Group, LLC, et al., No. 3:17-cv-00214 (D.S.C. January 24, 2017) (putative class action brought on behalf of consumers residing in South Carolina alleging violations of the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act).

Hart v. Barbeque Integrated., No. 2:17-cv-00227 (D.S.C. January 24, 2017) (collective and class action alleging defendant restaurant failed to pay tipped employees minimum wage and overtime compensation in violation of FLSA and state wage and hour laws).

Foster, et al. v. Livanova PLC, et al., No. 3:17-cv-00218 (D.S.C. January 24, 2017) (products liability class action lawsuit alleging defendants’ medical device exposed plaintiffs to potentially fatal bacteria during open chest surgery).

Turner, et al. v. Condustrial, Inc., et al., No. 3:17-cv-00205 (D.S.C. January 23, 2017) (putative class action and purported collective action brought under FLSA and state wage and hour laws alleging defendants misclassified employees as independent contractors to avoid paying overtime compensation or providing benefits).

Williams, et al. v. G4S Secure Solutions (USA) Inc., No. 1:17-cv-00051 (M.D.N.C. January 20, 2017) (collective and class action alleging defendant failed to pay straight time and overtime compensation to non-exempt hourly security officers in violation of FLSA and state wage and hour laws).

Jones, et. al. v. Wectec Global Project Services, et al., No. 3:17-cv-31 (W.D.N.C. January 20, 2017) (putative class action and purported collective action brought under FLSA and state wage and hour laws alleging defendants failed to pay current and former hourly employees overtime compensation).

Jones v. Wectec Global Project Servs., et. al., No. 3:17-cv-00031 (W.D.N.C. January 20, 2017) (putative class action and purported collective action alleging defendant’s 9/80 workweek plan violates FLSA and state wage and hour laws).

Levy, et. al. v. Charlotte School of Law, LLC, et. al., No. 3:17-cv-00026 (W.D.N.C. January 19, 2017) (in addition to Barchiesi, this is the second putative class action against Charlotte School of Law for alleged misrepresentation of its ABA accreditation status to prospective and current students).

Strak, et. al. v. Managed Recovery Systems, Inc., et. al., No. 6:17-cv-00159 (D.S.C. January 18, 2017) (purported class action alleging Managed Recovery Systems improperly used mail, telephone and facsimile in its debt collection efforts in violation of the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act).

Cunningham v. ShopperLocal, LLC, No. 1:17-cv-00024 (M.D.N.C. January 10, 2017) (putative class action brought under the Telephone Consumer Protection Act alleging defendant called plaintiffs using an auto-dialer to sell advertising space without plaintiffs’ consent).

English, et. al. v. Café Enterprises, Inc., No. 3:17-cv-00038 (D.S.C. January 5, 2017) (putative class action and purported collective action brought under FLSA and state wage and hour laws alleging defendant restaurant failed to pay tipped employees minimum wage while performing side work at the beginning and end of their shifts).

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U.S. Supreme Court to Decide Circuit Split: Are Class Action Waivers in Employment Arbitration Agreements Enforceable?

View Amanda Pickens’ Complete Bio at robinsonbradshaw.com

On Friday, the United States Supreme Court granted three petitions for certiorari to determine a quickly developing circuit split. The question before the Court is whether the National Labor Relations Board is correct in its interpretation that class action waiver provisions in certain employment arbitration agreements are illegal under federal labor law. Since 2011, when the U.S. Supreme Court permitted such waivers in AT&T Mobility LLC v. Concepcion, employers have relied upon them to require that disputes be resolved through individual arbitration. The NLRB over the past few years has issued numerous decisions invalidating arbitration agreements because they contained class and collection action waivers. The NLRB has stood its ground and routinely stated that such waivers violate employees’ rights under the National Labor Relations Act and are unenforceable.

The U.S. Supreme Court has agreed to hear three cases. Each involves the question whether the NLRA prohibits employers from requiring the non-management employees covered by the NLRA (employees not defined as “supervisors”) to arbitrate their work-related claims individually rather than as a class. The three cases come from the Fifth, Seventh, and Ninth Circuits.

The Fifth Circuit, in Murphy Oil USA, Inc.v. NLRB, overturned the NLRB’s decision that Murphy Oil had unlawfully required employees at its Alabama facility to sign an arbitration agreement waiving their right to pursue class and collective actions. The Fifth Circuit held that the pro-arbitration policy of the Federal Arbitration Act overrides federal labor law interests and requires enforcement of the class waivers. On the other side of the circuit split, the Seventh and Ninth Circuits have held that corporations cannot require employees to give up their rights to pursue work-related claims on a class-wide basis. The U.S. Supreme Court will review Lewis v. Epic Systems Corp., a case in which the Seventh Circuit held that an arbitration agreement precluding collective arbitration or collective actions violates federal labor law and is unenforceable under the Federal Arbitration Act. The Court will also hear Morris v. Ernst & Young, a decision from the Ninth Circuit invalidating Ernst & Young’s mandatory arbitration agreement because it required employees to bring all claims in arbitration and limited such claims to those brought on an individual basis. These decisions put the Seventh and Ninth Circuit squarely at odds with the Second, Fifth, Eighth, and Eleventh Circuit, with more yet to weigh in.

The Fourth Circuit has not addressed this issue yet, although it has held that the availability of class arbitration under the terms of the arbitration agreement is a question for the Court, not the arbitrator, to decide, as we discussed last March. North Carolina courts have not addressed the NLRA waiver issue, nor are they likely to have the opportunity, although the Court of Appeals did follow the U.S. Supreme Court in holding that contractual waivers of class proceedings in arbitration agreements are permitted in North Carolina.

Stay tuned for further developments from the U.S. Supreme Court.

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