Tag Archives: Damages

Business Court Approves Disclosure-Only Settlement, But Postpones Consideration of Attorneys’ Fees Request

View Mark Hiller’s Complete Bio at robinsonbradshaw.comThose who follow class action law probably will be familiar with In re Trulia (2016), the seminal decision of the Delaware Court of Chancery that put the brakes on disclosure-only settlements.  Before Trulia, these controversial settlements were ubiquitous in deal litigation, in which shareholders of a company file a class action lawsuit seeking to stop the company from engaging in a merger or acquisition on the ground the company failed to disclose sufficient information about the transaction.  Under a typical disclosure-only settlement, the company agrees to supplement its disclosures and pay the (often hefty) fees of class counsel.  In return, the company obtains a release from the shareholder class, and the deal can proceed.

That changed with Trulia.  The court lamented that disclosure-only settlements are often raw deals for shareholders, who release potentially valuable claims in exchange for no monetary compensation, but only additional disclosures that may be insignificant.  Compounding the problem is that, because both class counsel and the company are aligned in supporting the settlement, the court is on its own to determine whether the settlement is fair and reasonable to absent shareholders.  True, the Trulia court noted, courts face that task any time they evaluate a proposed class action settlement that has no objectors.  But the court said the task is especially difficult in deal litigation, because disclosure-only settlements are usually reached quickly, before there has been any significant discovery into the potential value of the shareholders’ soon-to-be-released claims.  The Trulia court drew a line in the sand, holding that Delaware law looks with “disfavor” on these settlements and would allow them only if the supplemental disclosures were “plainly material” and the shareholder releases were “narrowly circumscribed.”

Court watchers viewed Trulia as the death knell to deal litigation in Delaware and have wondered whether the plaintiffs’ bar would migrate to other jurisdictions that might be more hospitable.  That is why the Business Court’s recent approval of a disclosure-only settlement in the Krispy Kreme shareholder litigation provides a significant data point.  The litigation arose from a shareholder challenge to Krispy Kreme’s proposed acquisition by another company.  The settlement called for supplemental disclosures and payment of class counsel’s fees, in return for a shareholder release.

Chief Judge Gale analyzed Trulia and discussed the standard North Carolina law should apply to review the reasonableness of disclosure-only settlements.  Judge Gale said he is “fully in accord with Trulia’s enhanced scrutiny to determine whether the release is narrowly circumscribed.”  At the same time, however, he said that “[a]s the scope of the release narrows,” the “Court’s inquiry as to the materiality of supplemental disclosures and their adequacy to support the release tends to a more traditional settlement inquiry where the judgment of competent counsel is accorded significant weight.”  Here is how he summarized the test:

In sum, the Court must examine the materiality of any supplemental disclosures and find that they provide reasonable consideration for the class release. But where there is little or no opposition by class members, the Court is reluctant to set aside a fair arm’s length settlement negotiated between competent counsel if the disclosures are not plainly immaterial and the release is reasonable. The Court is less reluctant to exercise a more searching inquiry when deciding upon a fee request that does not depend on the validity of the settlement.

Judge Gale then applied this test and concluded that the release at issue was reasonable in view of Krispy Kreme’s supplemental disclosures. He focused mainly on the company’s disclosures about the discounted cash flow (DCF) analysis performed by its financial advisor. In a nutshell, the proxy statements had disclosed that the DCF estimate was based on certain projected free cash flows, but did not disclose the cash flows themselves. As it turned out, the cash flows described in the proxy statements differed somewhat from the cash flows the financial advisor used in its actual calculation. As Judge Gale noted, “[c]ounsel acknowledged that while the differences may be slight in any particular year, the differences over time have greater significance.” Judge Gale concluded from this that the company’s supplemental disclosures, which contained cash flow information not found in the proxy statements, were material and supported the shareholder release, which was “not significantly broader than the effect of the Shareholder Vote” approving the merger.

As to the question of attorneys’ fees, Judge Gale deferred ruling on that issue. One shareholder had filed an objection opposing the award of fees but not otherwise opposing the settlement. Judge Gale concluded that he could “uncouple” the fee request from the rest of the settlement because the settlement expressly said that its approval was not dependent on a fee award. This uncoupling would have the benefit of allowing the company to advocate on the fee question without fear of jeopardizing the settlement and release.1

Takeaway

Time will tell whether deal litigation and the accompanying disclosure-only settlements, which now are disfavored in Delaware, will find a home in North Carolina. Nominally, Judge Gale’s formulation of the standard for reviewing these settlements—which favors approval so long as the disclosures are not “plainly immaterial”—seems more deferential than Trulia’s—which requires the disclosures to be “plainly material” (my emphasis). But at least arguably, the Krispy Kreme disclosures might have satisfied the Trulia standard too. And, settlement approval was facilitated by the fact that Judge Gale was able to reserve decision on the request for fees; had he been forced to rule on the reasonableness of the fees and supplemental disclosures together, he may have shown greater skepticism of the settlement. Regardless, Judge Gale’s approval of the Krispy Kreme settlement shows that North Carolina law has, at minimum, not sworn off approval of disclosure-only settlements.

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1 Judge Gale noted that the Court of Chancery has approved of a “mootness dismissal” procedure that allows the court to evaluate the fee request independent of the substantive settlement. Under that procedure, the “selling company issues supplemental disclosures, the class representative dismisses the class action with a release that binds only the named plaintiff, and class counsel applies for a fee award based on efforts to secure the supplemental disclosures.” Judge Gale explained that North Carolina law “has not expressly adopted such a process or procedure,” and he found it unnecessary to decide whether to recognize the procedure in this case.

Follow Up – Dish Network Denied New Trial and Slapped with Trebled Damages of $61 Million

View Amanda Pickens’ Complete Bio at robinsonbradshaw.com Today we provide you with an update on a previous blog post addressing Dish Network’s plea for a new trial after a jury awarded damages of $20.5 Million in a telemarketing class action lawsuit. After a five-day trial in January, a jury awarded damages by assigning $400.00 to each of the 51,119 distinct phone calls made in violation of the Telephone Consumer Protection Act (the “TCPA”).

Although Dish hoped for a new trial, Judge Eagles issued a text order denying Dish’s Motion for Judgment as a Matter of Law and Motion for a New Trial on May 16, 2017.

After the jury verdict, both parties submitted written closing arguments to the Court on whether Dish willfully violated the TCPA. Dish argued the Plaintiffs should not be entitled to treble damages because Dish complied with TCPA, had a business interest in preventing unwanted telemarketing calls, believed Satellite Systems Network (“SSN,” Dish’s terminated marketing retailer) complied with the TCPA, instructed SSN to scrub its call list against the National Do-Not-Call Registry and not to call the named plaintiff, received almost no complaints during the class period, and had no actual knowledge that SSN was not adhering to the applicable telemarketing laws during the class period.

In an order issued yesterday, Judge Eagles rejected Dish’s arguments and awarded treble damages, stating Dish “did nothing to monitor, much less enforce” SSN’s compliance with telemarketing laws, and it “repeatedly looked the other way” when it learned of SSN’s noncompliance.

Specifically, Judge Eagles found that Dish’s contracts with SSN gave it “virtually unlimited rights” to monitor and control SSN’s telemarketing efforts. And, although Dish was committed to monitoring SSN’s compliance on paper, in reality, it ignored SSN’s violations of telemarketing laws. When SSN received a customer complaint, it would send the complaint to Dish and wait for instruction. Dish disclaimed responsibility for any customer complaint and shifted blame to SSN, while making no effort to determine whether SSN was actually complying with the TCPA. According to the opinion, Dish also ignored several customer complaints about SSN between 2004 and 2010, and it was aware of three lawsuits against the telemarketer resulting in injunctive relief and monetary damages. Despite having actual knowledge of customer complaints and lawsuits, Dish continued its relationship with SSN, allowing SSN to market and sell Dish’s products. Dish did not restrict SSN’s authority to act on its behalf, and it never conducted an investigation to determine if SSN had solved its compliance problems.

The Court held Dish responsible for any willful or knowing violations of the TCPA by SSN because the jury found (and the Court agreed) that SSN was acting within the scope of its authority from Dish. The Court further held that even if Dish were not responsible for SSN’s violations, the result would be the same, because Dish willfully violated the TCPA. According to the opinion, Dish knew SSN had committed many TCPA violations, but it did nothing. Dish received numerous customer complaints about SSN, and it knew of three lawsuits alleging violations of the TCPA. Dish knew SSN was not scrubbing its call list against the Do-Not-Call Registry, yet Dish made no effort to monitor SSN’s compliance with telemarketing laws. Ultimately, the Court held Dish “simply did not care whether SSN complied with the law or not.”

Judge Eagles concluded treble damages were appropriate in this case to deter Dish from future violations and to give appropriate weight to the scope of the TCPA violations. The Court trebled the jury’s award of $400.00 per call to $1,200 per call, totaling approximately $61 Million in damages.

Seventh Circuit Weighs In on “White or No Underwear” Policy

View David Wright's Complete Bio at robinsonbradshaw.comOccasionally, we see something outside of the Carolinas that is quirky enough to merit a mention in this space.  Such is the Seventh Circuit’s recent decision in Mulvania v. Sheriff of Rock Island County, No. 16-1711 (7th Cir. Mar. 9, 2017).  According to Wikipedia, “In 2015 Rock Island (Illinois) was ranked the 32nd ‘Best Small City’ in the country.”  Not influencing those rankings, apparently, was the policy of the Rock Island County Jail, which “requires female detainees to wear either white underwear or no underwear at all.”  What, you ask, might be the “compelling government interest” that allegedly supports such a policy?  As the Seventh Circuit described, “[t]he Sheriff’s sole stated rationale for the underwear policy was to prevent detainees from extracting ink from colored underwear.”  This was a problem, in the Sheriff’s mind, because “detainees could use that ink to make tattoos.”   Despite the dearth of examples of such tattoo creation by detainees, the Sheriff testified that the policy was founded on such “security concern[s].”  This policy apparently has not been confined to Rock Island County; indeed, the defense argued that the white underwear policy was “within the correctional mainstream.”

The district court denied certification of the “underwear class” and granted summary judgment in favor of defendants.  On the merits, the Seventh Circuit reversed, holding that the record supported the inference that “the asserted security concern about tattoo ink from underwear is not genuine.”

The district court’s class certification decision was based on predominance and numerosity.  As to predominance, the court found that the “damages would vary for individual class members based on factors such as how long a detainee was deprived of her underwear, whether she was on her menstrual cycle or pregnant and other considerations.”  The absence of a “simple or formulaic method to calculate damages,” in the view of the lower court, precluded class certification.

The Seventh Circuit summarily reversed this determination, noting that “this reasoning was a mistake.”  According to the Court of Appeals, “it has long been recognized that the need for individual damages determinations at [a] later stage of the litigation does not itself justify the denial of certification.”

Alas, however, there were not enough underwear detainees to mount a class challenge.  After observing that “a forty-member class is often regarded as sufficient to meet the numerosity requirement,” the Seventh Circuit held that the class period only yielded 29 members–there was no basis upon which the plaintiffs’ amended complaint “related back” to the initial complaint, which might have supported a higher number.

It remains unclear, as of this post, whether Rock Island’s policy has been amended and whether this case will impact its ranking as the “Best Small City.”

Dish Network Hopes for a New Trial of Telemarketing Class Action Lawsuit after $20.5 Million Jury Verdict

View Amanda Pickens’ Complete Bio at robinsonbradshaw.comDish Network has asked the Middle District of North Carolina for a new trial in its telemarketing class action lawsuit after a jury found Dish liable for violations of the Telephone Consumer Protection Act. After a five-day trial ending on January 19th, a jury awarded damages to the class of $20.5 million.

The lawsuit was filed in 2014 by lead plaintiff Thomas Krakauer alleging Satellite Systems Network, an authorized Dish dealer, called him multiple times between 2009 and 2011 despite being listed on the Do Not Call registry. In September 2015, Judge Catherine Eagles certified two classes, both consisting of persons on the Do Not Call registry who received telemarketing calls from Dish or Satellite System Network between 2010 and 2011.

After the United States Supreme Court decided Spokeo Inc. v. Robins, Dish filed a motion to dismiss or, in the alternative, to decertify the class. We highlighted the issues before the Spokeo Court in our previous blog post. In Spokeo, the United States Supreme Court vacated and remanded a decision allowing a consumer who suffered no concrete harm to sue Spokeo Inc. for procedural violations of the Fair Credit Reporting Act. But the Supreme Court left the opportunity open for plaintiffs in other cases to rely on procedural violations entailing a risk of “concrete injury” to establish standing. The Supreme Court found that the Ninth Circuit’s standing analysis was incomplete because it failed to consider both requirements of an injury-in-fact, that the injury be both concrete and particularized. The Ninth Circuit’s opinion concerned only the particularization of the injury-in-fact.

In August 2016, in a six-page opinion, Judge Eagles denied Dish’s motion to dismiss and to decertify the class based on Spokeo. Judge Eagles noted that although Spokeo “clarified the meaning of a concrete injury,” it did not fundamentally change the doctrine of standing. She found that now “a concrete injury ‘must exist,’ but it can be intangible.” Judge Eagles held that the telemarketing calls made in violation of the Telephone Consumer Protection Act were more than bare procedural violations; the calls “form[ed] concrete injuries because unwanted telemarketing calls are a disruptive and annoying invasion of privacy.” Dish sought an interlocutory appeal of this decision, which was also denied.

Now, after a five-day trial and a $20.5 million jury verdict, Dish is hoping for a new trial. Dish claims, among other things, that the verdict violates Dish’s due process rights because Judge Eagles allowed the jury to impose aggregate damages, rather than allowing Dish to defend each individual claim of an improper phone call. The jury calculated damages by assigning $400.00 per call to the 51,119 distinct phones calls, totaling approximately $20.5 million. Plaintiffs’ response to Dish’s motion for a new trial is due March 28th. If Dish’s motion for a new trial is denied, Dish will likely appeal these issues to the Fourth Circuit. Stay tuned for further developments.

Judge Gorsuch’s Class Action Opinions After Shook

View Susan Huber's Complete Bio at robinsonbradshaw.com View Kevin Crandall’s’s Complete Bio at robinsonbradshaw.comToday we continue our analysis of Judge Gorsuch’s class action opinions from the Tenth Circuit in an effort to better understand how he may rule if confirmed for the Supreme Court. Last week, we examined Judge Gorsuch’s decision in Shook v. Board of County Commissioners, and we will take up his remaining class action opinions below.

McClendon v. City of Albuquerque, 630 F.3d 1288 (10th Cir. 2011)

In McClendon v. City of Albuquerque, decided three years after Shook, Judge Gorsuch again demonstrates judicial restraint. In McClendon, prisoners brought a class action against the City of Albuquerque, Bernalillo County, and various individuals involved in operating the Bernalillo County Detention Center. The parties entered into a pair of settlement agreements in 2005, but four years later the district court issued an order withdrawing its approval of the settlement and giving the plaintiffs permission to rescind those agreements after it found that the County misrepresented certain facts during settlement negotiations. The Tenth Circuit held that the order was not a “final decision,” subject to appeal under 28 U.S.C. § 1291. A final decision, Judge Gorsuch reasoned, dissociates the court from the case and ends the litigation on the merits, while the order withdrawing a settlement approval does “[j]ust the opposite: the order ensures litigation on the merits will continue in the district court.”

Judge Gorsuch empathized with the defendants’ desire for an appeal that might avoid further litigation in a previously settled case that was already fifteen years old: “the delays and costs associated with civil litigation in modern America are substantial and worrisome, and even the most hard-boiled litigator may raise an eyebrow at a case lasting as long as this one.” But neither the utility of the appeal nor the advanced age of the case swayed Judge Gorsuch to take an appeal beyond the bounds of the express authority in § 1291: “Congress’s direction demands our respect, not our rewriting.” Judge Gorsuch concluded his opinion by emphasizing the importance of judicial restraint:

[O]ne thing we may never do is disregard the bounds of our legal authority and assert § 1291 jurisdiction over an appeal where it doesn’t exist. To do so in this case would compound any error the defendants imagine with an impropriety of our own, making matters worse not better. It is, after all, a “central principle of a free society that courts,” no less than the other branches of government, “have finite bounds of authority.” . . . We must respect that principle and those bounds no less when it is hard to do so than when it is easy.

Hammond v. Stamps.com, Inc., 844 F.3d 909 (10th Cir. 2016)

The Tenth Circuit’s holding in Hammond v. Stamps.com, Inc.—that the minimum amount in controversy under the Class Action Fairness Act need only be legally possible and not factually probable—is hardly noteworthy, as it falls squarely in line with the law from other Courts of Appeals. But in Judge Gorsuch’s opinion, his most recent in the class action arena, we see the hallmarks of conservative jurisprudence: interpreting statutory text (here, “in controversy”) with its “traditional meaning”; citation to the Federal Judiciary Act of 1789; and a nod toward the late Justice Antonin Scalia’s textualist approach with a citation to his book, Reading Law. Indeed, it is only after a three-page textual and historical deep dive that Judge Gorsuch cites in the final paragraph of the opinion the “several courts [that] have held as we do today.”

For those of you who yearn to know the facts of the case, Elizabeth Hammond brought a putative class action in New Mexico state court, alleging that Stamps.com engaged in misleading and unlawful trade practices by insufficiently disclosing its subscription fees to customers. She alleged that “hundreds or thousands of persons” called to cancel their Stamps.com subscriptions as a result of Stamps.com alleged wrongdoing, and each class member would “likely” receive $31.98 in damages (the cost of subscribing for two months) or $300 in statutory damages. Stamps.com presented uncontested evidence that 312,680 customers had cancelled their subscriptions during the likely class period, and the company removed the case to federal court because the amount in controversy well exceeded the $5 million threshold for the Class Action Fairness Act. The trial court granted Ms. Hammond’s motion to remand, ruling that the company had not met its burden of establishing the minimum amount in controversy because it failed to exclude from its calculations those customers who cancelled their subscriptions for reasons unrelated to the allegations in the complaint, or as Judge Gorsuch put it, “without proof from Stamps.com establishing how many of its customers were actually deceived, the district court thought the company couldn’t satisfy the $5 million ‘in controversy’ requirement.” The Tenth Circuit vacated and remanded the district court’s remand order, ruling that federal jurisdiction was proper under CAFA: the proponent of jurisdiction should not have to “argue against himself, task[ed] with the job of proving his own likely liability in a sufficient number of individual cases simply to get a foot in the door of the federal courthouse.”

BP America, Inc. v. Oklahoma ex rel. Edmondson, 613 F.3d 1029 (10th Cir. 2010)

In an earlier CAFA jurisdictional decision, the Tenth Circuit in BP America granted discretionary leave for the propane gas distributor to appeal an order remanding the case to Oklahoma state court. The merits of the jurisdictional question—whether the Attorney General’s lawsuit, brought on behalf of the state and not any individual consumers, constitutes a “mass action” involving monetary relief to 100 or more people under CAFA—were not at issue at this preliminary stage of the appeal.

Judge Gorsuch’s opinion adopts multiple factors to consider in deciding whether to grant discretionary leave to appeal under CAFA § 1453, including whether the appeal presents an important, unsettled, or at least “fairly debatable” CAFA-related question and a weighing of the relative harms to the parties should an appeal be refused or entertained.

Heller v. Quovadx, Inc., 245 F. App’x 839 (10th Cir. 2007)

Although it actually predates Shook, the unpublished decision of Heller v. Quovadx, Inc., is worth noting, if only to highlight the wry humor employed by Judge Gorsuch in dismissing a non-class member’s argument that denying him standing to object to a settlement would violate his Fifth Amendment rights. In addition to the fact that the non-class member presented “no evidence or relevant legal argument to support his contentions,” he also “spen[t] the bulk of his brief noting the inefficiencies and burdens of paper-based litigation.” Perhaps a sentiment with which class action lawyers and judges can relate all too well.

Substantively, the Tenth Circuit affirmed the district court’s determination that the non-class member lacked standing to object to the proposed settlement. Non-class members opposed to a proposed settlement cannot object directly and instead must seek to intervene under Rule 24.